Roaming Through the Roman Ruins: Students "do as the Romans do" in Volubilis

Each year, AALIM takes its students to visit Volubilis (known in Arabic as “Walili”) to learn about ancient Roman culture. AALIM students have enjoyed coming to Walili for its well-preserved architecture, colorful mosaics, spectacular views, and rich history.

Students sit on the stairs of Volubilis.

Students sit on the stairs of Volubilis.

The story of Hercules as told through mosaic art.

The story of Hercules as told through mosaic art.

Students, professors, and language partners jump for joy before the entrance of Walili.

Students, professors, and language partners jump for joy before the entrance of Walili.

In addition to basking in the picturesque views, students learned from their guide that Walili was famous for its olive oil and wine-making. Students meandered through the city and discovered surprises at every turn, such as ancient mosaics as pictured above.  Despite the heat, students had an amazing time with friends and faculty in one of the oldest, most historic sites in Morocco.

Located outside Walili lies medina Moulay Idriss Zerhoun, which was named for Sultan Moulay Idriss in 789. Sultan Moulay Idriss is largely credited for bringing Islam to Morocco; thus, many Moroccans cherish medina Moulay Idriss for its religious and historical significance.

Students strike their best pose in Moulay Idriss.

Students strike their best pose in Moulay Idriss.

Students navigated the narrow streets to find the best view of Moulay Idriss. From above, students could see the olive trees, minarets, colorful homes, vast mountains, and all the treasures hidden within Moulay Idriss.           

Students catch a bird’s-eye view of Moulay Idriss.

Students catch a bird’s-eye view of Moulay Idriss.